Cybercriminals are trying to get the login credentials for your wallet through phishing emails.

Ethereum phishing attack earns $15K in two hours

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Ethereum phishing attack earns $15K in two hours

 

Ethereum phishing attack earns $15K in two hours. Wesley Neelen (security researcher) has received a phishing email that seems to be from the legal online Ethereum wallet site Myetherwallet.com.

Cybercriminals are trying to get the login credentials for all type of accounts through phishing emails. By tricking possible victims to enter their username and password on a fake website (legitimate-looking), the attackers are able to obtain to confidential data and/ or financials for their personal gain.

According to the phishing e-mail:
“We have pushed an update that allows smooth sailing for all the MyEtherWallet users in the process of the upcoming hard fork. To make use of this update we request all users to sign in to their MyEtherWallet accounts and synchronize their wallets for continuous undisturbed use of our services.”

This scam states that Myetherwallet implemented an update and that they want users to click on an embedded link, unlock their account, and confirm their balances. Ethereum phishing attack earns $15K in two hours.

If someone clicked on the link they would be taken to a website that seemed identical to the legitimate Myetherwallet.com site. Users also may have seen something strange, which is a small comma underneath the letter “t” in the address bar. The attackers used a Unicode trick that enables them to register domains that contain Unicode characters that look very similar to Latin characters. Ethereum phishing attack earns $15K in two hours.

If someone wrote their wallet password, the attackers would use this password to access the victim’s wallet and send the coins to their own wallet.

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Ethereum is an open-source, public, blockchain-based distributed computing platform featuring smart contract (scripting) functionality.[2] It provides a decentralized Turing-completevirtual machine, the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM), which can execute scripts using an international network of public nodes. Ethereum also provides a cryptocurrency token called “ether”, which can be transferred between accounts and used to compensate participant nodes for computations performed.[3] “Gas”, an internal transaction pricing mechanism, is used to mitigate spam and allocate resources on the network.

Ethereum was proposed in late 2013 by Vitalik Buterin, a cryptocurrency researcher and programmer. Development was funded by an online crowdsale during July–August 2014.[5] The system went live on 30 July 2015, with 11.9 million coins “premined” for the crowdsale.[6] This accounts for approximately 13 percent of the total circulating supply.

In 2016 Ethereum was forked into two blockchains, as a result of the collapse of The DAO project, thereby creating Ethereum Classic. The new forked version is Ethereum (ETH), subject of this article and the one that continued its existence is Ethereum Classic (ETC). Ethereum phishing attack earns $15K in two hours.

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